Virginia

$14.00$172.50

H&G = Heading and grommets. Usually outdoor use for regular inground flagpoles.
PH = Pole Hem NO Fringe. Can be used on a 5 ft or 6 ft outdoor flagpole that extends from a building or Indoor use for flag sets and/or parade poles.
PHF = Pole Hem Fringe. Indoor use for flag sets and/or parade poles.

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This flag was adopted on February 1, 1950. The colors of the flag are blue, red, white, blue, black, gold, purple, brown and buff. The flag was designed in1861. The designer is mainly George Wythe, however, Charles Keck, Richard Henry Lee, George Mason, and Robert Carter Nicholas were contributors. The design has the seal of Virginia on an azure field. A female figure representing Virtus, a symbol of peace, standing in a pose which indicates a battle already won. She rests on her long spear, its point turned downward to the ground. Her other weapon, a parazonium, is sheathed; it is the sword of authority rather than that of combat . Tyranny lies beneath the foot of Virtus, symbolizing Great Britain’s defeat by Virginia. The crown which has fallen to the ground beside him represents the new republic’s release from the control of Great Britain. The broken chain in Tyranny’s left hand represents Virginia’s freedom from Britain’s control over their colonial trade and westward expansion. The whip in his right hand represents Virginia’s relief from the torturing whip of acts of punishments. The motto selected for the obverse of the Virginia seal is Sic semper tyrannis, or in English, Thus always to tyrants. This is a derived quote from the famous events in Roman history, attributed to Brutus upon his participation in the slaying of Julius Caesar. (Caesar had been named perpetual dictator of Rome in the same year, and some Senators believed he had ambitions to abolish the Roman Republic and establish himself as a monarch.) A joke referencing the image on the seal that dates back as far back as the Civil War, is that Sic semper tyrannis actually means Get your foot off my neck.The reverse of the seal pictures the blessings of freedom and peace, as represented by three Roman goddesses. In the center is the matron Libertas the goddess of individual liberties. In her hand she holds a wand showing her magical gifts, at the top of the wand hangs a Phrygian Cap, also called a Liberty Cap ? later made popular by French revolutionaries. To the left of Libertas stands Ceres, the Roman goddess of agriculture. In her left hand is a horn of plenty overflowing with the abundance of Virginia’s harvests, while in her right hand is an enormous stalk of wheat, representing one of Virginia’s leading crops. Aeternitas, representing Virginia’s eternity, stands at the right of Libertas. In her right hand is a golden ball, an emblem of authority, and atop the ball is a Phoenix, symbolizing immortality. On the Virginia seal, the phoenix represents effective government. The motto gracing the reverse with its trio of Libertas, Ceres, and Aeternitas is Perseverando, or in English, Persevering, a reminder to future generations of the need to persist in maintaining the blessings of liberty. The ornamental border on both sides of the seal consists of sprigs of Parthenocissus quinquefolia, or commonly, Virginia Creeper. In 1930 another committee was charged with standardizing the seal’s design because of all the variations that came into use over the years. The seals that now adorn the doors of the Southern Portico of the Capitol in Richmond were designed by Charles Keck.[2][3] What the committee approved was basically adopting the 1776 seal as the standard. In 1949, another standard was implemented, when Virginia’s Art Commission defined the official color scheme for the seal.[7] The Great Seal and the lesser seal are the same except for size. The lesser seal is used on commissions of commonwealth officials and notaries, and on other papers which remain within the boundaries of, or relate only to, Virginia. All outdoor flags are finished with heading and brass grommets (H&G). PH denotes pole hem for indoor and parade use. PHF denotes pole hem and gold fringe.

Weight N/A
Material / Size / Finish

Nylon – 12 inches by 18 inches – H&G, Nylon – 2 feet by 3 – feet H&G, Nylon – 3 feet by 5 feet – H&G, Nylon 4 feet by 6 feet H&G, Nylon – 5 feet by 8 feet – H&G, Nylon – 6 feet by 10 feet – H&G, Nylon 3 feet by 5 feet PH, Nylon 4 feet by 6 feet PH, Nylon 3 feet by 5 feet PHF, Nylon 4 feet by 6 feet PHF, Polyester Bunting 3 feet by 5 feet H&G, Polyester Bunting 4 feet by 6 feet H&G, Polyester Bunting 5 feet by 8 feet H&G

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